Tuesday, 27 March 2018

Wisdom Teeth

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about wisdom teeth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Josh McCormick, DDS   
4455 Cowell Road   
Concord, CA 94518   
(925) 685-3043   
MyEastBayDentist.com

Sunday, 18 March 2018

Nutrition: What You Eat Affects Your Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Your mouth, teeth, and gums are more than just tools for eating. They’re essential for chewing and swallowing-the first steps in the digestion process. Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also that of your teeth and gums. In fact, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth. Here are a few helpful things to know about how what you eat can impact your dental health.

Diet and Tooth Decay
The foods you eat and the beverages you drink can have a direct influence on the incidence and progression of tooth decay, depending upon: 

  • The form of the food-whether it’s liquid, solid, sticky or slow to dissolve makes a difference. 
  • How often you eat sugary foods and beverages and how often you eat or drink acidic foods and beverages. 
  • The nutritional makeup of the food. 
  • The combination of the foods you eat and the order in which you eat them. 
  • Medical conditions you may have, such as gastrointestinal reflux and eating disorders, which can increase risk of cavities and weaken teeth.

How Snacking Affects Your Dental Health
For dental health, it’s recommended that people limit eating and drinking between meals. Of course, sometimes eating between meals must happen. Unfortunately, most people choose foods like sweets and chips for snacks; foods that harm teeth by promoting tooth decay. If you do snack, make it a nutritious choice-such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, vegetables or nuts-for your overall health and the health of your teeth. Did you know that certain foods can put you at risk for cavities and other dental health problems? Here are some MouthHealthy tips.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Recommended Nutritional Guidelines
  • Foods That Harm Your Dental Health
  • Sugar and Your Dental Health
  • How Sugar Substitutes Affect Your Teeth
  • 4 Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Cavities

Josh McCormick, DDS   
4455 Cowell Road   
Concord, CA 94518   
(925) 685-3043   
MyEastBayDentist.com

Tuesday, 13 March 2018

What if an Object Gets Caught in Your Teeth?

Learn what the American Dental Association's answer is to the question: "What if an Object Gets Caught in Your Teeth?".


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Josh McCormick, DDS   
4455 Cowell Road   
Concord, CA 94518   
(925) 685-3043   
MyEastBayDentist.com

Sunday, 11 March 2018

5 Reasons Your Smile Is Stronger Than You Think

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

The right smile can leave you laughing, fill you with joy or make you melt with emotion. But, ultimately, the best smile is one that is healthy and strong. Here are some of the “tooth truths” about how tough your teeth really are - and how to keep them that way.

1. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the body.
The shiny, white enamel that covers your teeth is even stronger than bone. This resilient surface is 96 percent mineral, the highest percentage of any tissue in your body - making it durable and damage-resistant.    

2. Your bite is powerful!
Did you know your teeth can exert an average of 200 pounds of pressure when you bite down? That’s probably what tempts us to use our teeth as tools from time to time ñ but as your dentist will remind you, that’s one of the worst habits when it comes to preserving healthy teeth.    

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Teeth can last for hundreds of years
  • Strong as they are, teeth can't heal on their own
  • Healthy teeth have the power to resist decay, but they need our help

Josh McCormick, DDS   
4455 Cowell Road   
Concord, CA 94518   
(925) 685-3043   
MyEastBayDentist.com

Tuesday, 6 March 2018

How Often Should a Senior Citizen Go to the Dentist?

Learn what the American Dental Association's answer is to the question: "How Often Should a Senior Citizen Go to the Dentist?".

 
The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Josh McCormick, DDS   
4455 Cowell Road   
Concord, CA 94518   
(925) 685-3043   
MyEastBayDentist.com

Sunday, 4 March 2018

Is Sparkling Water Bad for My Teeth?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation-including sparkling water-has a higher acid level, some reports have questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form).

So, Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?
According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth-and here's why. In a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth. 

Tips for Enjoying Sparkling Water-and Protecting Your Teeth

  • Sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water, too-it’s the best beverage for your teeth. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away the leftover food cavity-causing bacteria feast on and keeps your mouth from becoming dry (which can put you at a higher risk of cavities). 
  • Be mindful of what’s in your sparkling water. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that does increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.
  • Sparkling water brands with added sugar can no longer be considered just sparkling water. They are a sugar-sweetened beverage, which can contribute to your risk of developing cavities. So remember-sparkling or not-plain water is always the best choice.

Josh McCormick, DDS   
4455 Cowell Road   
Concord, CA 94518   
(925) 685-3043   
MyEastBayDentist.com